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Academics

PROGRAMS

Graduate School:

Doctor of Management*
Doctor of Educational Management*
Master in Educational Management*
Master in Public Administration

*In consortium with NOrSU

School of Law:

Bachelor of Laws (LLB)

Undergraduate Programs:

BS Physical Therapy
BS Nursing
Bachelor in Medical Laboratory Science (Formerly Medtech)
BS Radiologic Technology

BS Accountancy
BS Entrepreneurship
BSBA Marketing Management
BS Hotel and Restaurant Management

BS Information Technology
BS Information System
BS Computer Science

BS Criminology

AB Political Science
AB Mass Communication

Diploma in Midwifery

BASIC EDUCATION: DE LA SALLE SUPERVISED SCHOOL

DMC - Science High School
DMC-Grade School (Grade 1 AY 2010-2011)
DMC – Preschool

SHORT COURSES/Technical – Vocational

Caregiving NC II
CISCO Networking Academy Program (CNAP)
Microsoft Office Application
Java Programming
Adobe Photoshop
Net Programming
C Programming
Open Source Application
Household Services NC II
Housekeeping NC II
Commercial Cooking NC II
Bartending NC II
Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) NC II
Gas Metal ARC Welding (GMAW) NC II
Building Wiring Installation NC II
Computer Programming NC IV

APPLIED COURSES

Bachelor of Laws
Doctor of Medicine
Doctor of Dental Medicine
Master of Arts in Nursing
Master in Information Technology
BS Pharmac

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Vision

Guided by the institution’s vision, the College of Arts and Sciences aims to be recognized as one of the best liberal arts colleges among comprehensive mid-sized schools and universities.

Mission

To provide a comprehensive, holistic, and interdisciplinary education through the integration of excellent teachings with scholarly and creative activity, thereby preparing undergraduate and graduate students with knowledge, values and skills needed in our diverse world

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

I. VISION – MISSION AND OBJECTIVES

Objectives:

  1. To make the Vision-Mission the foundation of all the activities and output of the department
  2. To establish various learning activities for the students such as marketing and entrepreneurial activities and departmental celebrations
  3. To conduct a joint project with partner agencies/linkages
  4. To link with business establishments for the on-the-job-training of the student as part of curricula.
  5. To support and promote the community extension programs and activities of the department as well as regularly feature its development projects and plans.
  6. To promote interactive, participative, and student-centered activities through the regular publication of student outputs in the media.
  7. To give recognition to instructors for their teaching excellence and pedagogy in teaching through in-service trainings and publication of their outputs.
  8. To collaborate with other departments to come up with excellent research and in advertising referred works.

II.PROGRAMS:

BS in Accountancy

Bachelor of Science in Accountancy (BSA) prepares students for entry into a variety of fields in accountancy, including corporate accounting, accounting information systems, and governmental accounting, as well as entry into graduate programs such as law. It also equips students with basic and advanced accounting concepts, principles and procedures. In addition to doing accounting functions for business enterprises, the students are prepared for public accounting after passing the CPA licensure examination.

Accounting is an information system for measuring, analyzing, and communicating information useful in making economic decisions. A program in accounting provides students with the skills and concepts necessary to provide this information to those with direct and indirect financial and managerial interest in economic activities. 

BS in Business Administration major in Marketing Management

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration major in Marketing is a degree program for students who intend to pursue a professional career in the marketing discipline. The program equips students with knowledge and skills in running and managing marketing outfits. They will be exposed to basic and advanced theories, principles and practices related to the product, price, place, and promotion, both local and international.

Career Options:

Managers in a business, government or non-government organization
Careers in marketing

III.CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

A talk on franchising was recently held in the auditorium.
Franchise expert and owner of several franchises Rodulf Kotik gave the talk.

Students interview Mr. Kotik about tips on successful franchising.

IV.FACULTY DIRECTORY:

CAS Faculty

Atty. Jose Jeffrey A. Ortega
Ms. Marissa Villamil
Ms. Cherrie Rose J. Sagario
Ms. Michelle Baliber
Engr. Elvira B. Acbay
Ms. Erlinsie T. Sy
Mr. Ramil Dominic R. Quirong P.T. MPA
Ms. Jean B. Ybañez
Ms. Bonnie P. Arnesto
S/Sgt.Jeffrey S. Laput (Res) PA
Mr. Val Richtoffin G. Concha
Atty. Yolando G. Villaruz
Ms. Dara Saquin

School of Business Faculty

Atty. Albert T. Concha, Jr
Ms. Marites G. Refugio, MBA
Mr. Edlin Anthony A. Ang, CPA
Ms. Kathleen Kaye G. Concha, CPA
Atty. Miguel Abas, CPA
Atty. Jose Jeffrey A. Ortega
Engr. Elvira B. Acbay
Mr. Jovanie O. Talaroc
Ms. Mercy N. Mañosa
Ms. Erlinsie T. Sy
Ms. Dina E. Moran
Ms. Bonnie P. Arnesto
Ms. Mirasol Rollon-Reyes
Engr. Ramil Joyohoy
Ms. Cherrie Rose J. Sagario
Mr. Ramil Dominic R. Quirong

V.MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

On behalf of my faculty colleagues, I welcome you to the College of Arts and Sciences webpage.

The academic works and creativity of the arts and sciences faculty and students define the intellectual and instructional core of the school. Cognizant of this tradition, the faculty members of the College will provide guidance and opportunities for students to explore new things, to encounter new ideas and opinion, and discover their own capabilities. Here, students will have the opportunity to clarify and put in place their own values and principles in an atmosphere conducive to the harmonious development of the physical, the mental and the spiritual, which is what true education is all about.
We, therefore, invite the brightest and most motivated students to join us as we explore and teach at the frontiers of our disciplines here at DMC College Foundation where two important goals can be reached. The first goal is to acquire the knowledge and skills to become employable and be an independent adult.

The second most important goal is that DMC College Foundation can help students prepare for a quality adult life in the global village. Through a sequence of courses we call General Education, they can learn the skills and attitudes that can help them make a positive impact in the world at large.

General Education at DMC College Foundation will help prepare students to become an articulate communicator, a careful thinker, a person who is concerned with good health, environmental protection and healthy interpersonal relationships. This aspect of their education will awaken inquiries into areas they never thought interesting before, and indeed add sparkle and innovation to their world.

Seize the day, seize the opportunity and be a part of the DMC College Foundation experience.

MS. KAREN I. INEGO
OIC DEAN

VI.ADMISSION AND RETENTION POLICY

ADMISSION AND RETENTION POLICIES FOR BS MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING

I. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

A.INCOMING FRESHMEN

1. General average of at least 84%.
2. Passing score in the College entrance examination.
3. Form 138
4. Certificate of Good Moral Character
5. NCSO Authenticated Birth Certificate
6. Two (2) 2 x 2 pictures

B.TRANSFEREES

1.All transferees from other schools and universities are admitted on probation. Accounting courses taken from other schools will be considered only if the following grades have been obtained by the students.

Accounting 1 and Accounting 2 & 3 – 2.25 (84%) or better
Accounting 4 and higher Accounting courses - 2.25 (84%) or higher.

2.Those with grades lower than stated above will be required to re-enroll the accounting courses involved.

3.Only professional courses in English and Mathematics taken from other schools, with ratings of 2.25 (84%) or better will be credited.

4.Only non-professional courses included in the curriculum taken from other schools with grades of 3.0 (75%-76%) or better will be credited.

5.For students taking up any program under the Business and Management Education of DMC College Foundation who would like to shift to BS Management Accounting, an average grade of 2.25 (84%) from Accounting 1 and Accounting 2 & 3 is required provided he/she has no grade lower than 2.25 (84%) in both accounting courses. Students who incurred a grade lower than the cut-off grade requirements may be allowed to re-enroll the course.

6.Only students entering in their third or lower years may be admitted to the program provided they have complied with the provisions of B1.

7.Transferees should present certificates of good moral character from the school they last attended.

II. RETENTION

1.A student must obtain an average grade of at least 2.25(84%) in Accounting 1 and Accounting 2 & 3 provided he/she has no grade lower than 2.25 (83%). A student who falls short of the cut-off grade may be allowed to re enroll the course.

2.The minimum grade requirement for all higher Accounting courses and other Business professional courses is 2.5 (80%-82%). A failing grade in any of these accounting courses will disqualify the student from continuing the BS Management Accounting program.

2.Two failures in any non-accounting courses will disqualify the students from continuing BSMA program.

ADMISSION AND RETENTION POLICIES FOR BSBA AND BSE

I. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

A.INCOMING FRESHMEN

1.General average of at least 82%.
2.A passing score in the College entrance examination.
3.Form 138
4.Certificate of Good Moral Character
5.NCSO Authenticated Birth Certificate
6.Two (2) 2 x 2 pictures

B.TRANSFEREES

1.All transferees from other schools and universities are admitted on probation. A student must have a grade of at least 2.5 (82%) in all major courses and other business professional courses. He/she must have no failing grade in any course from his/her previous school. In addition, his/her grade point average in his previous institution must be at least 2.5 (82%) per semester.

2.All transferees must take and pass the College Entrance Examination.

3.Transferees should present Honorable Dismissal from the school last attended.

C.RETENTION

1.To continue in the program, a student must have earned credits in at least 70% of the total units enrolled in.

2.A student who fails to meet Requirement B1 may request for readmission in writing. His/her case will be studied by the Committee on Admission and Retention. Upon the recommendation of this Committee, and after having been given academic counseling, such a student may be readmitted and placed on probation. His load will be reduced by 3 units for every 6 units failure/dropped/left or lapsed (for incomplete).

3.A student on probation who fails to meet the retention requirements shall be dropped from the program.

4.A maximum of eight failures will disqualify the student from continuing in the Business Administration program.

D.READMISSION

1.A student who was dropped from the program maybe readmitted provided he/she meets requirements B1.

ADMISSION AND RETENTION POLICIES FOR BSA

I.ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

A.INCOMING FRESHMEN

1.General average of at least 85%.
2.A passing score in the College entrance examination.
3.Form 138
4.Certificate of Good Moral Character
5.NCSO Authenticated Birth Certificate
6.Two (2) 2 x 2 pictures

B.TRANSFEREES

1.All transferees from other schools and universities are admitted on probation. A student must have a grade of at least 2.0 (85%) in all major courses and other business professional courses. He must not have a failing grade in any course from his/her previous school. His/her grade point average in his previous institution must be at least 2.0 (85%) per semester.

2.However, the student must first pass a qualifying examination before credit will be given to a course. He needs to garner a grade of at least 75% in the qualifying examination based on the accounting courses taken.

3.Those with grades lower than the above mentioned, and also those who fail in the qualifying examination will be required to re-enroll the accounting courses involved.

4.Only students entering in their third or lower years maybe admitted to the program provided they have complied with the provisions of B1.

5.Transferees must take and pass the College Entrance Examination.

6.Transferees must present Honorable Dismissal from the school last attended.

C.BSA as a Second Course

1.Graduates of any program, except BSC or BSC Management Accounting, are exempt from the admission requirements for the incoming freshmen (1 – 4) but they are covered by the BSA retention policies.

2.BSC and BSC Management Accounting graduates shall retake all Accounting courses except Accy 1 and Accy 2 & 3 provided a general average of 2.0 (87%) or higher is obtained.

D.SHIFTEES

1.A student from other programs within the institution or from other colleges / universities taking up programs not related to Business and Management Education who wishes to shift to the BS in Accountancy Program should have:

a. Passed the interview and evaluation by the Chair

b. Must have no failing grade in any course from his/her previous institution. He must have a grade point average of at least 2.5 (80%) per semester in his previous institution.

c. Obtained a passing score in the College Entrance Examination.

2.Students from within the institution or from other colleges/universities taking up any program under the Business and Management Education who wish to transfer to the BS in Accountancy Program should have:

a. Passed the interview and evaluation by the Chair based on the following requirements:

b. An actual final grade of at least 2.0 (85%) in all accounting courses taken.

c. No failing grade in any course from his/her current program.

d. An actual grade point average of at least (2.5) 82% per semester

e. A grade of at least 75% in the qualifying examination based on the accounting courses.

f. Taken and passed the College Entrance Examination.

II.RETENTION

1.A student who obtains a grade of 5.0 (70%) or failed in any Accounting, Taxation and Business Law course shall no longer be admitted in the Accountancy Program.

2.A student who fails in 3 other units credit accumulated during his/her stay in the Department, shall not likewise, be admitted in the Department.

3.Two grades of dropped or withdrawn in any courses aside for Accounting, Taxation and Business Law shall be counted as one failing grade.

4.For incoming Second Year, a student shall, at least obtain an average of 2.0 (87%) in Accounting 1 and Accounting 2 & 3 with no grade below 2.0 (85%) in these two courses. The average grade of 2.0 is a requirement to enable the student to sit down for a qualifying examination. Passing the qualifying examinations is a requirement for enrollment in Accounting 4.

A student who fails in the qualifying examination is allowed to take the removal examination. If he fails in the removal examination, he must reenroll Accounting 2 & 3 and take another qualifying examination to remain in the Accountancy program. Failure to pass this qualifying examination means re-enrollment in Accounting 2 & 3. Removal examination is given only once.

5.For admission into the Third Year, a student shall at least garner a general average of 2.0 (87%) in Accounting 4, Accounting 4A with no grade below 2.0 (85%) in any of these courses. A grade of at least 2.0 (85%) in both courses is a requirement for taking the next qualifying examination. A student who incurs a grade lower than the regular cut-off grade requirement of 2.0 may be allowed re-enrolling the course.

A student who fails in the qualifying examination is allowed to take the removal examination. If he fails, he may repeat the last accounting course prior to the qualifying examination in summer or in the semester it is being offered. After obtaining the grade requirement, the student is allowed to take the qualifying examination again. Passing the qualifying exam is a requirement for enrolment in higher accounting courses.

6.For incoming Fourth Year, a student shall, at least, obtain a grade of 2.0 (85%) in Accounting 4B, Accounting 5A, Accounting 6A and Accounting 7.

7.Students who cannot meet the retention requirements Nos. 4 to 6 may transfer to any BME Programs.

CRIMINOLOGY DEPARTMENT

I.VISION, MISSION, OBJECTIVES

VISION

Guided by the institution’s vision, the College of Criminology aims to be recognized as a leading institution that shall produce graduates who have the knowledge and skills in addressing the problem of criminality in the country and the competence to meet the challenges of globalization in the field of criminology.

MISSION

To provide the community with professionally competent and morally upright graduates who can deliver efficient and effective services to the community.

OBJECTIVES

The main goal of DMC College Foundation - College of Criminology is to provide the quality instruction, guidance, and social orientation to produce competent and morally upright graduates who can deliver efficient and effective service to the community and to our country as a whole.

II.PROGRAMS

BS in Criminology

Bachelor of Science in Criminology focuses on the study of historical and contemporary patterns of crime and victimization, the social etiology of criminality, social responses to crime, and the processes of crime control. Criminologists combine theoretical and empirical methods to study crime and delinquency, including the manner in which offenders are processed. The functions and dynamics of the criminal justice system are studied in detail with emphasis on the linkage between these processes and various social institutions and organizations.

The Criminology curriculum is designed for students who are interested in studying the causes, prevention, and control of criminal activity. Students will acquire a broad base of knowledge about crime, criminals, victims, and the justice system.

III.CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

DMC Criminal Justice Education Student Council (DMC-CJESC)

Purpose

a.To function as a student organization;
b.To encourage participation;
c.To promote development of criminology students;
d.To foster communication between students and faculty in Criminology; and
e.To address program and other issues that directly affects the criminology students.

Criminology students listen attentively to a lecture on bomb awareness and detection

Aspiring criminologists at work. Students simulate a crime scene.

Students learn the systematic and proper way of handling evidence.

Crime processing involves a series of important steps, measurements, and documentation.

A student get his hands on the paraphernalia.

Criminology students listen to a crime processing seminar-lecture.

IV.FACULTY

Atty. Reynaldo P. Concha
Dean

Atty. Arturo H. Nunag
Consultant Dean

Renante B. Salvaña
Coordinator

P/Supt. Roderick C. Pausal, PNP
Part-time Instructor

PO1 Rowell S. Cedeño
Part-time Instructor

V.ADMISSION AND RETENTION POLICY

ADMISSION POLICY

1. Freshmen

The DMC College of Criminology conforms to the institutional policies on admitting freshmen.

2. Shiftees

A student who intends to shift from any program within the College should obtain a GPA of at least 80%, incur no failing grade in any academic and non-academic subjects, and pass the interview conducted by the Dean or his designate.

3. Transferee

A student from another institution should comply with these requirements:

  • GPA of at least 80%
  • Submission of the following documents: recommendation letters or certification of good moral character, police clearance, transfer credential, certification of grades or transcript marked “for evaluation purposes only.”
  • Undergo interview conducted by the Dean or his designate
  • Pass the entrance examination

4. Other requirements (for freshmen)

Male applicants should at least be 1 meter and 62.5 centimeters in height. Female applicants should be 1 meter and 57.5 centimeters. Male applicants should not have long hair, tattoo, moustache or beard; and must not wear earrings.

5. Other requirements (for upper-classmen)

  • Police clearance every first semester during enrollment
  • Photocopy of complete set of class cards from the previous semester (original classcards must be shown)
  • Prescribed haircut
  • Hair non-dyed
  • No tattoo/s
  • No earrings (male)
  • No beard/moustache
  • In case a student fails in one or two courses (academic or non-academic), a corresponding one or two courses will be deducted from the scheduled number of courses to be enrolled in the succeeding semester/ term

COLLEGE OF NURSING & ALLIED MEDICAL SCIENCES

I.VISION – MISSION, AND OBJECTIVES

VISION

1.To recognize and determine the primary health care needs of and health services for the society in the community.

2.To acknowledge the responsibility in the promotion, development, and restoration of health; and prevention of diseases through proper dispensation of medications to patients.

3.The professional nurse must have self–sustained maintenance of moral integrity and national identity, and is always conscious to the alleviations from sufferings among poor families in the community.

4.The professional nurse will see to it that nursing profession is upheld, upgraded, and rationalized. The professional nurse must carry on its promotion and development.

MISSION

1.Identify nursing problems and the various health needs , analyze them, and make proper actions by way of appropriate recommendations

2.Coordinate nursing activities with any hospital services and other healthcare entities allied to the nursing profession

3.Assist attending physicians when examining patients; collaborate with other co-workers; record and make reports on the results of physicians’ diagnoses following policies , rules, and regulation specified in the operational manual for the attending nurse.

II.PROGRAMS

BS in Nursing

The BSN Program is a four-year program designed to prepare a professional nurse to render nursing care to individuals, families, and groups in any setting at any stage of the health-illness scale. 

Career Options for Nursing Graduates:

  • Institutional or Hospital Nursing
  • Community Health Nursing
  • Private Duty Nursing
  • Industrial Or Occupational Nursing
  • Military Nursing
  • Flight Nursing or Aerospace Nursing
  • School Nursing
  • Clinic Nursing
  • Independent Nursing Practice
  • Pharmaceutical Representatives
  • Nursing Education

III.COMMUNITY EXTENSION SERVICES

BSN students conduct health teachings to children at San Antonio Elementary School.

IV.FACULTY DIRECTORY

COLLEGE OF NURSING

Dr. Ma. Grace F. Gurdiel - Dean
Prof. Henry P. Ogoc, M.N. - Dean Consultant
Ms. Jo-Ann M. Borbon, RN, MN - Director, Community Health Nursing
Ms. Vida S. Omamalin, RN, MN - Director, Academics
Ms. Jennifer B. Jarantilla - Clinical Director
Ms. Clarissa J. Darcera, MN - Coordinator, BSN-Level I
Ms. Nena B. Hoyohoy, RN, MN - Coordinator, BSN-Level II
Ms. Maridol B. Claro, RN, MN - Coordinator, BSN-Level III
Ms. Jennifer B. Bañanola, RN, MN - Coordinator, BSN-Level III
Ms.Ellie Jean E. Barillo, RN, MN - Coordinator, BSN-Level IV
Ms. Marilou T. Regencia, RN, MN - Coordinator, BSN-Level IV
Isolde L. Adaza, RN, MN
Maria Rose O. Alarin, RN, MN
Atty. Patrick Ivan A. Ang, RN
Ralph Vincent A. Ang, RN
Alvin Kirby A. Atienza, RN
Leslie A. Barbadillo, RN, MN
Ma. Terevic P. Belmonte, RN, MN
Jaypee B. Buhisan, RN, MN
Mark Wendel O. Cabugnason, RN
Aussie Charity T. Calibo, RN, MN
Lesly Ann G. Concha, RN
Dominic Sebastian B. Domen, RN
Rolan E. Ebillo, RN, MN
Eddor Evardo RN
Irish Enderez, RN, MN
Edsel D. Eway, RN, MAN
Ervin N. Gawchua, RN
Georgie T. Jumalon, RN
Reynald P. Kyamko, RN
Joseph B. Lagod, RN, MN
Benjie L. Mananzan, RN, MN
Charles M. Martin, RN, MN
Febe G. Nadonza, RN
Jaynes Nalzaro, RN, MN
Manuel Benjamin N. Paquibot, RN
Maria Teresa I. Paquibot, MAN, DM
Ivo B. Pardillo, RN, MN
Rester Y. Regencia, RN, MN
Redemtor R. Saavedra, RN, MN
Chrissa Bea B. Sanico, RN
Jackie Lou T. Sanoy, RN, MN
Maricor P. Solitario, RN, MN
Nasthassia Ursula April A. Te, RN
Ana Jane T.Albarracin, RN, MN
Jed Anthony A. Woo, RN
Maria Joyce Angeli A. Uy, MN

V.ADMISSION AND RETENTION POLICIES

I.ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Students who wish to enroll in DMCCF-College of Nursing are obliged to follow the set rules and regulations, to wit:

1. Incoming Freshman

1.1.High school card should have an average of 80% and above;
1.2.Entrance test score should be 40 and above;
1.3.Level of competency during interview should be 60% and above;
1.4.Incoming student must have undergone thorough physical examination.

2.Transferees

2.1.Transferees must comply with the abovementioned requirements except for the submission of the high school card.
2.2.In addition, transferees must submit a photocopy of his/her TOR for evaluation purposes.

3.For a student to be eligible to enroll in BSN II and III, they must;

3.1 Pass all major nursing subjects;
3.2 Have received complete doses of Hepatitis B immunization;
3.3 Pass the Nursing Aptitude Test/Assessment for Nursing Potential (a requisite to NCM 100.)
3.4 Have attended the official Cap and Badge Ceremony which required before a student can go on duty.
3.5 Follow the RLE policies stipulated in the RLE handbook.

4.For students to be eligible to enroll in BSN IV, they must;

4.1 Pass all the major nursing subjects and has taken up all minor subjects in the Levels I, II, III.
4.2 Pass the practical exam in the 1st semester and the oral exam in the second semester.

5.Board Exam Parameters

To qualify for the June Board Exam the student must obtain the following marks:

i.Pre-Board Exam Result of at least 40%
ii.Cumulative grade from Health Care I to NCM 104 of 30%
iii.Oral Examination Result – 30%

6.June Board Exam Review

All DMCCF College of Nursing graduates except second coursers, who will qualify to take the June licensure examination for the first time are required to take the supervised review before they are allowed to take the said examination.

The College of Nursing will announce the graduates qualified to take the June Licensure Examination within the graduation period.

The final announcement of qualified graduates is irrevocable unless officially amended by the College of Nursing itself;

Qualified graduates of Bachelor of Science in Nursing except second coursers will join the Supervised Review sanctioned by the administration of DMC College Foundation.

7.Grading System

The semestral grade is the average grade of all four terms (Prelim, Midterm, Semi and Finals). Each term grade is 25%

I.1 In NCM 100 to NCM 105, lecture is 60% and RLE is 40% ; RLE grade is based on skills, knowledge, and attitude;

I.2 Failure in either Lecture or RLE in any NCM subjects automatically results in failure of the NCM subject. The student must re-enroll the said NCM course the following semester.

I.3 No special schedule for quizzes will be given. However, for major exam a special exam can be given if the student can present a valid reason;

I.4 Student must pay the special exam fee of Fifty Pesos (Php 50.00) at the Accounting Office and must secure an absent slip dully signed by the Dean of the College of Nursing with attached medical certificate for them to be given the special exam.

5.Dean's List and Clinical Proficiency Award.

The following criteria should be met to qualify for Dean's List & Clinical Proficiency Award, to wit;

i. Must be a regular Student;
ii. Must not have a grade lower than 1.75 for Dean's List
iii. Must not have recorded tardiness or absences
iv. Is highly competent in utilizing nursing process in varying health situations for the Clinical Proficiency Awardees

CHN POLICY

I. PERSONAL APPEARANCE

1.1.1. Complete prescribed uniform must be worn (white blouse and blue pants with black shoes).
1.1.2. Rubber shoes or sneakers are not allowed
1.1.3. No wearing of White T-shirts and dark jeans during duty hours unless specified with the approval of the Clinical Director
1.1.4. Wearing CHN uniforms may be allowed during lecture provided that it has been scheduled by the instructor.
1.1.5. Hair must be kept and fixed; Hairnets are required for female students.
1.1.6. No jewelry of any kind shall be worn on duty except a watch with a seconds hand.
1.1.7. Students are required to be in assigned area 15 minutes before the time (7:45 AM). Taking public transport to and from the area is prohibited.

II. FIELD REQUIREMENTS

1. Complete CHN bag. Refer to the RLE handbook for a comlete list of paraphernalia. The CHN bag is checked on the first day of duty through entire period of CHN duties.

2. Written requirements:

i. First day of duty - general and specific objectives and the Daily Plan of Activities (DPA) which includes the daily specific objectives and the general objectives.
ii. Second day of duty - list of barangay and purok officials and a spot map
iii. Last day of duty of the week - reading output (with summary, reaction and reference) and weekly evaluation
iv. Third day of duty

  • IDB
  • Typology
  • Scale for Ranking
  • FNCP- at least 3 health problems
  • Survey questionnaire

v. Last day of duty - General Evaluation

RLE POLICY

1. Reporting Time

1.1. Students are required to render the required number of hours specified for each level.
1.2. Students are required to be in the assigned area 30 minutes before the time.
1.3. Students reporting for duty must be in complete, neat, and clean uniform.
1.4. Students must wear their nameplates.
1.5. Females must wear half slip/chemise; Males must wear white sando underneath the uniform.

2. Aprons must be removed when taking snack / lunch breaks outside the hospital
3. Students are not allowed to wear the hospital uniform after hospital duty
4. Students are required to wear the student nurse’s uniform with DIGNITY at all times.
5. Hair is not allowed to touch the collar. Visible hair adornments of any kind are not allowed. Black hairnets are required for females. Hair should not hang loose when in uniform even when not on duty. Proper short, clean, and uncolored haircut for males must be observed.
6. No jewelry of any form shall be worn on duty, except a watch with a seconds hand
7. Lost or destroyed IDs, pins, nameplates, or watches must be replaced within fifteen days. Failure to do so on the set date will mean that the student is considered absent until she/he presents the replacement.
8. Students are not allowed to wear LR-DR/OR uniforms outside the special areas. White school uniforms must be worn traveling to the hospital, during snack and lunch time, and also in commuting to DMCCFI school campus
9. Students are not allowed to loiter in the wards or hospital corridors during and after duty hours.
10. Students must notify their respective clinical instructor / team leader when leaving the ward for any reason.
11. Students are not allowed to have their lunch / snacks outside the hospital premises. The school is not liable for any untoward incident that may happen to any student who violates the policy. Students are allowed 15 minutes for snacks and 30 minutes for lunch.
12. When transacting official business in the ward beyond duty hours (for ward class, case presentations, follow-up of clients) all student nurses must wear the standard smock uniform with nameplate and must inform the head nurse/staff nurse of the purpose of their presence in the ward.
13. Smoking in the hospital compound and when on duty is not allowed
14. Drinking alcoholic beverages and use of illegal drugs are grounds for expulsion
15. Students must avoid undue familiarity with patients, relatives, and other members of the health team.
16. Students must address each other formally while on duty. Terms of endearment must be avoided.
17. Students should avoid discussing confidential matters regarding the patient and significant others.
18. Students are prohibited from using image-capture devices, video-cameras, cellular phones with camera features and other similar equipment.
19. Telephones in the clinical area are not for student use.

A. Errors and Mistakes

  • Errors and mistakes in the RLE area should be reported immediately to the CI
  • All cases shall be investigated following the proper channel of communication
  • The student shall then write an anecdotal report submitted to CI concerned with in 24 hours, then to the Dean with a proper written explanation.

B. Major Offenses

Any of the following constitute a major offense:

  • Tampering of RLE record and/or patients’ records
  • Signature forgery (CI, Doctors, Deans & Asst. dean)
  • Stealing in any form including misappropriation of funds entrusted by a group or by other students
  • Administration of drugs that produce harmful effect on the patient, resulting in complications or death due to error
  • Viewing of pornographic films or materials inside the hospital premises
  • Grave disrespect for and causing physical harm to clinical instructors

Sanctions

1) 1st major offense – warning + 5 days extension with anecdotal report
2) 2nd major offense – 10 days extension with anecdotal report
3) 3rd major offense – referral to the Disciplinary Officer for sanction.

C. Minor Offenses

Minor offenses include:

  • Habitual tardiness
  • Receiving visitors while on duty
  • Loitering in the hospital
  • Reading unrelated texts or doing irrelevant matters while on duty
  • Minor errors in the performance of treatment and nursing procedures, although little or no harm may have been done to the patient.

Sanctions

1st minor offense – warning
2nd minor offense – 3 days extension
3rd minor offense – 5 days extension
4th minor offense – 10 days extension & will be referred to the Disciplinary Officer

D. Attitudes and Behavior

The following attitudes/ behaviors are subject to disciplinary action:

  • Grave disrespect to an instructor whether from within the school or from any other school, to hospital authority, or to another student.
  • Oral defamation
  • Causing physical harm to an instructor whether from within the school or from any other school, to hospital authority, or to another student.
  • Refusal to follow an assigned task
  • Truancy while on duty
  • Undue familiarity with patient, significant others, instructors, doctors, and other hospital personnel
  • Use of obscene language so as to cause public censure
  • Immorality (e.g. serious sexual displays and other illicit acts in the hospital)

E. Classification of Absences

1. Excused 1 Absence :1 Extension Duty

  • Illness with sick notice (Medical certificate from DMC Hospital)
  • Death or burial of immediate family members supported with a letter
  • Force majeure (typhoon, floods, fire)
  • Absence due to official school function

2. Unexcused 1 Absence : 2 Extension Duties

  • Caring for the sick relative both immediate & distant ones
  • Attending weddings, family reunions & other activity not related to duty
  • Extension of vacation
  • Illness without notification
  • Reporting to duty 15 minutes after the schedules reporting time. (7:15 am)

Note: A student who exceeds 20% absence of the total required number of hours per rotation is considered failed in that particular area.

NURSING ARTS CENTER POLICIES

The Nursing Arts Center (NAC) is furnished with complete facilities, equipment and supplies necessary for instruction, lecture, and demonstration in order for the students to learn and develop their skills in performing nursing procedures in preparation for actual exposure in the hospital. Furthermore, for the purposes of safety and avoidance of delay, students and instructors are obliged to observe maintenance of strict discipline, cleanliness, and orderliness in the NAC by adhering to the following policies;

1. Those who wish to use the NAC or borrow any of its item / supplies / equipment, shall wear proper uniform with nameplate and ID.

2. Demonstration, lecture, or return demonstration shall be permitted only when scheduled a day prior to the said activity.

3. Borrowing items, supplies, and/or equipment shall not be allowed unless the borrower presents and deposit a valid school ID, signs the borrowers slip, and records his transaction on the logbook at the front desk.

4. Items, supplies, and equipment must be released and returned only during regular office hours: 8am – 12 noon, 1 - 5 pm, Mondays to Fridays; and 8am – 4pm Saturdays and Sundays.

5. Upon returning the borrowed items, supplies, or equipment, the borrowers must claim their ID's and borrower's slips from NAC-in-charge. Failure to claim ID's and borrower's slip will mean the borrowed item, supplies, or equipment have not been returned.

6. A fine of 20 pesos will be imposed on the borrower for a one-day lapse of any unreturned item, supply, or equipment; and 10 pesos for the succeeding day, thereafter.

7. It is the responsibility of the NAC In-charge and personnel to arrange and maintain cleanliness in the NAC and to indicate in the NAC logbook the scheduling of NAC room use, date and time borrowed, and the return of the items, supplies, or equipment in the proper place.

8. If any damage to borrowed materials, equipment, or to the NAC room itself, has been observed, it shall be the obligation of the borrower / user to pay twice the amount of the said item, supply, equipment; or to pay twice the cost of repair of the damaged room regardless of whether the damage was intentional or not. All payments for violations shall be made at the Business Office, and the receipt must be presented to the NAC in-charge.

9. Return demonstration must be followed as scheduled.

10. During Ret-demo, students are not allowed to stay inside the skills laboratory. Students, however, are allowed in the hallway where waiting benches are placed. Silence must be observed at all times.

11. It is the obligation of the students to perform after-use care of the material, equipment, or room used. Students must maintain cleanliness and order through their use of the NAC.

ACADEMIC POLICY

1. All BSN female students are required to wear their complete school uniforms (white uniform with black closed shoes and black socks/stockings) and neatly keep their hair using hairnet when coming to lectures.

2. All BSN male students are required to neatly cut their hair short. “Barber cut” is recommended. They must wear their complete school uniform (white uniform with black leather shoes and white socks).

3. No hair streaks and dyes are allowed.

4. Portable music players and other audio-visual materials are not allowed during lecture hours. Cell phones must be put on silent mode.

5. Absences:

A student is considered absent from class if he/she is not present within the first third fraction of the scheduled class time. Thus, a student is considered absent if he/she arrives after:

1) Beyond 20 minutes in a 60-minute class
2) Beyond 30 minutes in a 90-minute class
3) Beyond 40 minutes in a 120-minute class
4) Beyond 80 minutes (1 hour and 20 minutes) for a 240-minute(4 hours) class

Although members of the faculty are expected to begin their classes promptly, various contingencies that are sometimes unavoidable may cause some faculty members to be late for class. In such cases, the following guidelines are to be observed:

1) For a 60-minute (1 hour) class, students should not leave until after 20 minutes has passed.
2) For a 90-minute (1 hour and 30 minutes) class, students should wait for 30 minutes.
3) For a 120-minute (2 hours) class, students should wait for 40 minutes.
4) For a 240-minute (4 hours) class, students should wait for 1 hour and 20 minutes.

  • Instructors/Lecturers/Professors arriving late within the time schedule may mark students absent if they leave their class earlier than the prescribed time.
  • All subject instructors/lecturers are NOT allowed to give extensions during classes; Extensions only apply to RLE duty.
  • Three late entrances (tardiness) shall be counted as one absence.
  • An absence slip duly signed by the College of Nursing dean with attached Letter of Proof (eg medical certificate) should be presented to the instructor/lecturer within a week after the absence.
  • A student who has incurred absences of more than 20% of the required total number of class hours in a given time should not be given credit and is considered Failure Debarred (FD).

Minor Subjects:

  • Nutrition & Diet Therapy
  • Community Development
  • Research
  • Asian Civilization with Transcultural Nursing
  • Teaching Strategies in Health Education
  • Pharmacology
  • Nursing Informatics

Major Subjects:

  • NCM 100 - 105
  • PPP
  • Theoretical Foundations in Nursing (TFN)
  • Health Assessment

Prompt and regular attendance in the class is required of all students from the first meeting of every subject. Time lost by late enrollment shall be considered time lost by absence.

Legitimate Excuses for Absences:

  • Sickness / Suffering an illness (must be presented with a Medical Certificate)
  • Death of an immediate family member (must be presented with a Death Certificate of the deceased immediate family member)
  • Official school business (must be presented with a Letter of Request duly signed by the school official)

Special Examinations:

The student need not pay the fee for special exam if he/she takes the exam within the week after the scheduled examination, with the following reasons:

Sickness with Medical Certificate
No permit during the scheduled examination

The student has to pay the Special Exam Fee (Php50) if he/she takes the exam one week after the scheduled examination (second week)

How to Secure for a Special Exam Form:

1. Ask for a special exam form from the Dean’s Office
2. Fill up the form properly, stating your reason
3. Let the instructor/lecturer sign first before the Academic Director
4. Have the dean of the College of Nursing sign
5. When approved, pay the fee at the Accounting Office
6. Submit the Dean’s Copy to the Academic Director together with the receipt

  • If the student passes the given special exam, the highest possible score that he/she may get is 75%.
  • If the student fails, his/her grade is computed based on the score that he/she garners
  • If the student fails to take the special examination within the allowed time span of 2 weeks after the scheduled exam, he/she is considered FAILED on that parameter.
  • The passing grade is 75% or an equivalent of 3.0. However, the cut-off grade of the College is 77% or an equivalent of 2.75. If a student incurs a semestral grade of 3.0, he/she is advised to retake the same course on the next semester wherein it will be offered by the College.

NURSING INFORMATICS - BSN STUDENTS PROJECT



By: Fitzpatrick Group 1

ALLIED COURSES

I.PROGRAMS

BS in Physical Therapy

Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy is a five-year academic program of studies for an allied medical profession whose main purpose is  the promotion of optimal health and function by providing services that develop, maintain and restore maximum movement and functional ability, relieve musculoskeletal pain and prevent or limit permanent physical disabilities of patients suffering from injuries or diseases.  Physical Therapy includes the art and science of evaluation and treatment by means of therapeutic exercise, heat, cold, light, water, manual manipulation, electricity and other physical agents for the care of individuals whose ability to function is impaired or threatened by disease or injury.

Career Options:

  • Physical therapist clinician in various settings such as hospitals, out patient physical therapy clinic, athletic and sports training facilities, skilled nursing facilities, hospices, corporate and industrial settings.
  • Teacher or educator in the academe
  • Researcher
  • Further education in medicine, graduate studies or law

BS in Radiologic Technology

I. VISION- MISSION

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY

To be acknowledged as a highly competent institution which continuously answers the need for diagnostic and therapeutic services both in the local and global perspective

Mission

1. To provide for the country with dynamic, competent, socially-conscious and ethical scientific techniques in medical imaging and therapy

AT the end of the program radiologic technology graduates shall have:

1. Acquired and developed the knowledge of the various physical principles involved in diagnostic imaging and therapeutic application;
2. Developed awareness of the possible risks involved in the application of various radiant energies to human for diagnostic therapeutic or research purposes aas well a the ways of minimizing such risks;
3. Developed the skills of proper positioning of patients in the different procedures called for in any particular study employing the appropriate exposure factor to achieve desired results;
4. Acquired and developed knowledge, attitudes, values, and skills necessary to contribute to the overall social, mental, and physical health of the community and country;
5. Responded to the technological advancement in the field of radiologic sciences through research and continuing education.

SCHOOL OF MIDWIFERY

I. VISION – MISSION, AND OBJECTIVES

VISION

The midwifery course is geared towards the preparation for creative and useful membership in society.

Upon completion of the program, the student shall have acquired the necessary concepts, attitudes and skills essential to his/her personal development and his/her being a member of a community health development team.

MISSION

Midwifery practice in the Philippines has been recognized as one of the primary health care services for the people, particularly those living in remote areas. DMC-College Foundation School of Midwifery acknowledges the value of this role in our health care system and, thus, aspires to produce graduates who have:

OBJECTIVES

1.Obtained up-to-date knowledge and skills necessary to render midwifery services to the public with competence and dedication;
2.Accepted their responsibilities as members of a community health development team;
3.Mastered the scientific handling of delivery cases and the knowledge required for community health, nutrition and population education. 

II. PROGRAMS

Midwifery

Midwifery is a health care profession where providers offer care to childbearing women during pregnancy, labor and birth, and the postpartum period. They also care for the newborn through to six weeks of age, as well as assisting the mother with breastfeeding. Midwives may also offer inter-conceptional care including well-woman care.

A practitioner of midwifery is known as a midwife, a term used in reference to both women and men.

Midwives are autonomous practitioners who are specialists in low-risk pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum care. They generally strive to help women have healthy pregnancy and natural birth experience. Midwives are trained to recognize and deal with deviations from the norm.

Midwives refer women to general practitioners or obstetricians when a pregnant woman requires care beyond the midwives' area of expertise. In many jurisdictions, these professions work together to provide care to childbearing women. In others, only the midwife is available to provide care. Midwives are trained to handle certain situations that may be described as normal variations or may be considered abnormal, including breech births, twin births and births where the baby is in a posterior position, using non-invasive technology

III. HISTORY

The Government Recognition for the Two-Year Midwifery Course was granted to the school on June 9, 1980 by the Ministry of Education and Culture through Republic Act 2706.

The School of Midwifery was the pioneering program offered by DMC College Foundation as an academic institution which remains strong and gronwing.

IV. CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Student midwives administer vitamins to an infant in the RHU.

Midwifery students assist in immunization at the Gulayon Health Center

A student midwife gives a Mother’s Class on Filariasis at the Gulayon Health Center

The students during their LR/DR exposure at the IPHO

Students perform urinalysis during their Community Exposure.

Assisting during immunization

Students familiarize with the locality in their Community Extension Services

Students give care to a wounded child.

Immersion time with the residents in Dicayas, Dipolog City

V. FACULTY DIRECTORY

GALAURA, FE
Registered Midwife, 1988
Registered Nurse, 2007
Full Time Clinical Instructor

VI. ADMISSION AND RETENTION POLICY

ADMISSION POLICY

Students who wish to enroll in DMCCF-School of Midwifery are obliged to follow the set rules and regulations, to wit:

A. Incoming Freshmen

1. High school card should have an average of 80% and above;
2. Entrance test score must be 40 or above;
3. Level of competency during interview should be 60% and above;
4. Student must undergo and pass the physical examination.

B. Transferees

All transferee's should undergo the same except for the submission of the High school card. In addition, the transferee shall submit a copy of his/her TOR for evaluation purpose.

COMMUNITY DUTY POLICY

1. Reporting Time

1.1. Students are required to render the mandated number of hours specified for each level.
1.2. Students are required to be in the assigned area 30 minutes before the time.
1.3. Students reporting for duty must be in complete, neat, and clean uniform.
1.4. Students must wear their own nameplates.
1.5. Females must wear half-slips and a chemise underneath; Males must wear white sleeveless shirts.

2. Aprons must be removed when taking snacks / lunch outside the hospital;
3. Students are not allowed to wear the hospital uniform after hospital duty;
4. Students are required to wear the student midwife’s uniform with DIGNITY at all times.
5. Hair is not allowed to touch the collar; visible hair adornments of any kind are not allowed. Black hairnets are required for females. Hair should not hang loose when in uniform even when the student is not on duty. Males are required to keep their hair proper short, clean, and uncolored;
6. No jewelry of any form shall be worn on duty, except a watch with a seconds hand;
7. Lost or destroyed IDs, pins, nameplates or watches must be replaced within fifteen days. failure to do so on the set date will mean that the student is considered absent until she/he presents herself/himself with the replacement;
8. Students are not allowed to wear their LR-DR/OR uniforms outside the special areas. The students shall wear white school uniform in going to or when leaving the hospital, during snack and lunch breaks, and in commuting to DMCCFI school campus;
9. Students are not allowed to loiter in the wards or hospital corridors during and after duty hours;
10. Students must always notify to the clinical instructor / team leader when leaving the floor for any reason;
11. Students are not allowed to have their lunch / snacks outside the hospital premises. The school is not liable for any untoward incident that occur when students who violate the policy. Students are allowed a15-minute break for snacks and a 30-minute lunch break.
12. When doing official business in the ward beyond duty hours (for ward class, case presentations, follow-up of clients) all student nurses must wear the standard smock uniform with nameplate and must inform the head nurse/staff nurse of the purpose of their presence in the ward;
13. Smoking in the hospital compound and when on duty is not allowed;
14. Drinking alcoholic beverages and use of illegal drugs are grounds for expulsion;
15. Students must avoid undue familiarity with patients, relatives, and other members of the health team;
16. Students must address each other formally while on duty. Terms of endearment must be avoided;
17. Students should avoid discussing confidential matters regarding the patient and significant others;
18. Students are prohibited from using image- and video-capture devices, cellular phones with camera features and other similar devices;
19. Telephones in the clinical area are not for student use;

A. Errors & Mistakes

  • Errors & Mistakes in the RLE area should be reported immediately to the CI
  • All cases shall be investigated following the proper channel of communication
  • Students must make an anecdotal report and submit the report to CIs concerned within 24 hours, and then to the Dean with a written explanation.

B. Major Offenses

Any of the following constitutes a major offense

  • Tampering of RLE record, patients records;
  • Signature forgery (CI, Doctors, Deans & Asst. dean);
  • Stealing in any form as well as misappropriation of money entrusted by other students.
  • Administration of drugs that produce harmful effect on the patient, resulting in serious complications or death;
  • Viewing of pornographic films or materials within hospital premises;
  • Grave disrespect and/or physical harm to Clinical Instructors

Sanctions

1st major offense – warning + 5 days extension with ANECDOTAL REPORT
2nd major offense – 10 days extension with ANECDOTAL REPORT
3rd major offense – sanction determined by the Disciplinary Officer

C. Minor Offenses

Any of the following constitutes a minor offense and requires an anecdotal report:

  • Habitual tardiness
  • Receiving visitors while on duty
  • Loitering in the hospital
  • Reading unrelated texts or doing irrelevant tasks while on duty
  • Minor errors in the performance of treatment and nursing procedures although little or no harm has been done to the patient.

D. Attitudes and Behavior

The following attitudes/ behaviors are subject to disciplinary action:

  • Grave disrespect to an instructor whether of the school or from other schools, to a hospital authority, and to another student.
  • Oral defamation
  • Causing physical harm to an instructor whether of the school or from other schools, to a hospital authority, and to another student
  • Refusal to follow assigned task
  • Truancy while on duty
  • Over familiarity with patient, significant others, instructors, doctors, and other hospital personnel
    Use of obscene language
  • Immorality (e.g. serious sexual displays and other illicit acts in the hospital)

Sanctions

1st minor offense – warning
2nd minor offense – 3 days extension
3rd minor offense – 5 days extension
4th minor offense – 10 days extension and sanction by the Disciplinary Officer

E. Classification of Absences

1. Excused 1 Absence :1 Day Duty Extension

  • Illness with sick notice (Medical certificate from DMC Hospital)
  • Death or burial of immediate family members supported with a letter
  • Force majeure (typhoon, floods, fire)
  • Absence due to official school function

2. Unexcused 1 Absence : 2 Days Duty Extension

  • Caring for a sick relative whether immediate distant
  • Attending weddings, family reunions; and other affairs not related to duty
  • Extension of vacation
  • Illness without notification
  • Reporting to duty beyond 15 minutes of the assembly time

Note: A student who exceeds 20% absence in each rotation per is considered failed in that particular area.

VII. FACULTY – STUDENT CONSULTATION

Saturdays from 8:00-12:00 AM

VIII. DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRAMS

CAREGIVING PROGRAM

I. VISION – MISSION, AND OBJECTIVES

OUR VISION

To produce students with health knowledge that can be used in the practice of Care Giving with heavy emphasis on skills that mold students into intelligent and practical health workers able to contribute to the care of the infant, toddler, child, elderly, the sick, disabled, and infirmed. This is made possible through employment of updates on the latest modalities in providing care, provision of health care facilities for actual demonstration and by ensuring students hands-on training in their respective field of specification.

OUR MISSION

DMC-College Foundation, Inc. believes in providing the best information and support in the formation of Caregivers with a reputation for efficiency, compassion, and dedication.

DMC-College Foundation, Inc. aims to motivate and gear students towards becoming responsible and competent individuals in giving primary care and assistance to those in need.

II. PROGRAMS

Caregiving is one of the most in-demand jobs locally and abroad; it is the fastest way of seeking careers in developed countries.

A caregiver is someone who provides continuous, full-time unsupervised care of children, the elderly, or the disabled in a private household.

DMC-CF offers the 6-month Caregiver Program. Our Skills laboratory is the most sophisticated and is unsurpassed in Region IX. The Laboratory is furnished with the finest fixtures and equipment.

Our program is TESDA-Accredited with a National Certification Level 2. The program has day, night, and weekend schedules.

Recently, the DMC Caregiver Department was named TESDA Assessment Center for Caregivers. The department is officially authorized to manage and administer assessment of candidates for certification by TESDA, under the supervision and evaluation of two in-house assessors and a TESDA representative. Caregiver graduates from other schools may also be assessed in DMC Caregiver Assessment Center. This is especially useful to local graduates as they need not travel to Zamboanga City for the evaluation.

The Caregiver Department also offers the Household Program for 216 hours or an equivalent of two months training. This program is designed for those who intend to work as domestic helps abroad, wherein proper training and a TESDA Certification are required by POEA before deployment.

III.CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Ms. Mariano & Ms.Garcia lead the outreach program in San Antonio, Katipunan.

Food preparation is one of the basic skills they learn in the class.

The Caregiver Department joins the Care & Share in San Antonio, Katipunan last December.

IV. FACULTY DIRECTORY


Ms. Racquel R. Mariano, MN
Coordinator/NAC Director


Ms. Melinda A. Garcia
Caregiver Asst. Instructor


Ms. Ana Mae R. Lacaya
NAR Asst. In-Charge/Caregiver Staff

CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

I.VISION – MISSION, AND OBJECTIVES

VISION

To be recognized as the first institution in the Mindanao to continuously provide highly competent professionals in the field of Medical Technology, who can render quality health services to the country and to the global society

MISSION

The main concern of Medical Technology Education in Dipolog Medical Center is to provide the country with medical technologists who are scientifically competent to deliver the full spectrum of medical technology services required in modern health care.

II.PROGRAMS

BS in Laboratory Science (Medical Technology)

Bachelor of Science in Laboratory Science is a vital part of the field of laboratory medicine. A Laboratory Scientist performs a myriad of laboratory tests to find the causes and cures for diseases. These tests include the analysis of blood, body fluids, cells, tissues, and also the isolation and identification of microorganisms which cause disease. In addition, the medical technologist performs tests which assess risk factors for disease and help determine overall health status. The medical technologist must be knowledgeable in basic sciences and skilled at using sophisticated laboratory instruments.

Employment opportunities for Laboratory Scientist are numerous. Besides work in hospital labs, positions are also available in research, administration, education, industry, private practice, and public health.

III.HISTORY

The increasing demand for health care manpower parallels with the behavioral, ecological and technological aspects of an ever-changing society. Such demand prompted the Dipolog Medical Center College Foundation, Inc. to offer the Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology Education, aiming to answer the needs for laboratory health services of the local, national, and even the international health agencies through its competent graduates.

DMCCFI is the only institution offering the BSMT course in the whole Region IX.

The BSMT course started in 1996 with only six(6) freshman students under the coordinatorship of Ivan Patrick A. Ang, RN. The BSMT program co-existed with two other programs, the BSRT and the BS Computer Science to compose the Unified Department.

In 1997, the coordinatorship of the Unified Department was handed over to Mrs. Rosalyn O. Turno, RMT who holds the post up to the present. Mrs. Turno and Mr. Jessie Recentes were the first full-time instructors hired by the college to teach Medtech major subjects.

It was in January 2000 that the BSMT program was issued a Government Recognition Permit (#019) for its full operation, with Dr. Chonilo O. Ruiz as the Dean.

A skills laboratory was set-up in 1998 at the DMC Hospital extension. It serves as a lecture and laboratory room for the junior students.

With the increasing population of the Medical Technology Department, a faculty office was established to accommodate the increasing number of its faculty members. It is now situated adjacent to the Chemistry Laboratory of the Nursing Building.

The DMC Medical Technology Program is a regular member of the Philippine Association of Schools of Medical Technology and Hygiene (PASMETH). It acquired a slot in the Safeguard Scholarship Program (sponsored by Procter & Gamble Phils. and PAMET) in 2006. The recipient of the scholarship was Marvie A. Bayawa who also graduated as the first cum laude of the department.

Since year 2001 graduates of the department have been rendering health care services globally. This just proves that the department’s Vision and Mission are fast materializing.

IV.FACULTY DIRECTORY

Dean
DR.CHONILO O. RUIZ

Coordinator
ROSALYN O. TURNO, RMT

Faculty Members
KAREEN T. OCUPE, RMT
MICHELLE C. ZULUETA, RMT
CHERIELOU C. DIRAN, RMT
JOSE PAULO L.. LEE, RMT
RACHEL O. OTUD, RMT, AMT
DR. RONNIE L. GURDIEL

COLLEGE OF COMPUTER STUDIES

A CHED Center of Development in I.T. Education in the Philippines

I.VISION – MISSION, AND OBJECTIVES

MISSION

To build a strong foundation of information resources and system that will enhance learning and skills for students and faculty members through project and research-based program.

VISION

To be one of the leading Information and Communications Technology institutions in the region and to produce competent graduates who will be able to meet industry needs.

II.PROGRAMS

BS in Information Technology (BSIT)

Bachelor of Science Information Technology (BSIT) Program is focused on the acquisition, deployment and management of information technology resources and services, as well as the development and evolution of technology infrastructures and systems for use in organization’s processes.

The BSIT program is specifically designed to provide an avenue of learning for students in a technology discipline such as web design and development, computer networking and security, and computer system administration. The program is meant to satisfy the ever-growing demands of the different Information technology aspects, namely, Web Systems, Databases and Computer Networking.

BS in Information Systems (BSIS)

Bachelor of Science in Information System is an undergraduate program that focuses on the effective design, development and implementation of information and communications technology (ICT) resources to ensure information systems, applications and resource viability in various industry sectors (business, education, media and entertainment, healthcare, government, and service).

The program is intended to train future ICT professionals in the science of conceptualizing, designing, implementing, maintaining and managing information and communications technology resources in specific and applied environments. This new breed of ICT professionals will support the corporate, end-user and ubiquitous computing services applied in various areas such as business, education, media and entertainment, and other industry areas.

This program takes into account the current revolution of technology and its future. The program acknowledges the fact that technology is not just computer and computers alone is not technology. With the myriad technological developments, specifically the convergence of computers, information technology and communications technology has led to new and innovative ways of doing things, from personal and household use to professional and business use.

The program recognizes that technology has not only penetrated the realm of business, education, government and other forms of groups and organizations but also the daily lives of people belonging to such environment. Such requires an understanding of this new dimension of technology vis-à-vis the real world. Technology has broken bridges between people and the organization, between home and schools, between the person and its community. This program is designed to produce students who recognize this impact and the potential of technology in the society of the future.

With the BSIS program, the definition of technology is now expanded to include convergence and emerging technologies and the domain to which it is applied, not just for business - but also for education, governance, personal, household, and entertainment.

BS in Computer Science (BSCS)

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science is a study of concepts and theories, algorithmic foundations, implementation and application of information and computing solutions. It prepares students to be IT professional and researches and to be proficient in designing and developing computing solutions.

Students under this program will be highly trained in software and system development.  The program’s main focus is to expose the students to different approaches and styles in developing programs whether they are procedural or the object oriented type of system approach.

Career Options:

  • Project Leader
  • System Analyst/Designer
  • Database Administrator
  • Database Designer
  • Programmer/Applications Developer
  • Web Designer/Developer
  • Mobile programmer
  • Network Administrator
  • Software Engineer

III.ADMISSION AND RETENTION POLICY

ADMISSION

1.Admission Requirements for New Enrollees

1.1.Photocopy of high school card (Form 138)
1.2.Birth Certificate (SECPA)
1.3.Certificate of good moral character from the high school principal
1.4.Two copies of 2x2 ID picture with collar
1.5.One long brown envelop

2.Admission Requirements for Transferees

2.1.Photocopy of Honorable Dismissal
2.2.Birth Certificate (SECPA)
2.3.Certificate of good moral character
2.4.Informative copy of Official Transcript of Records
2.5.Two copies 2x2 ID picture with collar
2.6.One long brown envelop

Although the college has an open admission policy to new enrollees in recognition of the basic rights of students to education, students with grade point average (GPA) of below 2.75 (77%) will be under provision.

Transferees with grade point average of 2.75 will be assessed considering the level of standard set by the previous college or university.

Provisionally admitted students must attain a grade point average of 2.75 at the end of the semester in order to remove the provisional status. Otherwise, they may be subject for deliberation and may be advised to shift to another program.

A minimum grade point average of 2.75 is required for graduation from Associate in Computer Technology Program.

Associate in Computer Technology graduates must have a minimum grade point average of 2.5 in all basic ITE and mathematics courses to qualify for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, Information Technology, and Information Management programs (junior and senior years).

IV.LINKAGES

The College of Computer Studies has international and national linkages with:

1.Java Education and Development Initiative (JEDI)
2.University of the Philippines Java Research and Development Center
3.Sun Microsystems/Oracle
4.CISCO Systems
5.Animation Council of the Philippines Inc. (ACPI)
6.Philippine Society of Information Technology Educators (PSITE)
7.Mechatronics and Robotics Society of the Philippines (MRSP)
8.Lasallian School’s Supervised Office (LASSO)

V. Student Organizations

  1. Philippine Society of I.T. Students (PSITS) - DMC Chapter
  2. Creative Digital Arts Club (CDAC)

 

VI. Curriculum

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

Associate in Computer Technology

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (Ladderized program. Must pass the ACT program)

Bachelor of Science in Information Systems (Ladderized program. Must pass the ACT program)

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering

VII. CCS Officials/Faculty

Dr. Gerald Tan Concha
Dean

Mr. Jovanie Omandam Talaroc
Vice Dean

Ms. Ma. Dara C. Saquin
CCS Level III & IV Coordinator/Faculty

Ms. Anne Fatima T. Pilayre
CCS Level I & II Coordinator/Faculty

Mr. Ivan Rey A. Moay
Faculty/System Administrator

Mr. Bryne Angelo M. Brilliantes
Faculty

Mr. Cristopher Jhon D. Herrera
Faculty

Mr. Andy S. Wong
Faculty

Engr. Carlo H. Ferandos
Faculty

SCHOOL OF HOTEL, RESTAURANT AND INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT

I.Vision – Mission, and Objectives

The School of Hotel Restaurant and Institution Management is committed to achieving the following objectives:

To produce world-class hospitality leaders and professionals who can respond to the needs of the hospitality industry, both in the domestic and international arenas.

To provide quality classroom instruction supplemented with seminars, workshops and experiences that will maximize the quality of the curriculum.

To immerse HRM faculty members in current hospitality trends through seminars, workshops international trainings, and affiliations.

II.Programs & linkages

BS in Hotel and Restaurant Management (BSHRIM)

Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management (BS HRM) is a specialized business degree which will prepare students for leadership roles in the hospitality industry.

The BS HRM curriculum is designed to provide a solid foundation in practical and managerial functions for hotel and restaurant operations, tourism and culinary arts.

BS in Hotel, Restaurant and Institution Management (BSHRIM)

Bachelor of Science in Hotel, Restaurant and Institution Management program integrates theory and practice to provide students with a strong management and service orientation as well as a global perspective of hotel and restaurant operations.

Students may choose from among the following fields of specialization:

1. Culinary Arts – This specialization aims to arouse students’ enthusiasm for food and its preparation. Students will be acquainted to the array of ingredients and to the art food preparation by working in a professional kitchen equipped with avante-gard utensils, cutlery, and cooking facilities. Students will also be taught the basic skills in butchery and fish-mongery. In this are, they will discover international cuisine. Similar areas such as financial management, entrepreneurship, franchising, and SME management are also integrated in this specialization.

2. Hospitality – This area focuses on hospitality services of lodging and dining. This area teaches students to maintain impeccable standards in managing and operating hotels and restaurants. Students will be taught about sustaining excellent customer relations. This specialization covers the entrepreneurial and management aspects of operating hotels and restaurants.

3. Tourism – This specialization aims to orient students to the trends in the tourism industry. Catering to travel needs of different parts of the globe will be studied here. Strategies in maintaining quality tourism service is also and important part of this area. Students are also taught personality development and a foreign language. Management courses are also integrated in this specialization.

Linkages:

Member, Hotel Restaurant Association of the Philippines (HRAP)
Member, Hotel, Restaurant and Resort Association of Dipolog (HRRAD)
Member, COHAREP
Member, Bartenders Association of the Philippines

III.ISSUANCE OF PERMIT FROM CHED

1.First and Second level for BS HRM, TP No. 011 Series of 2008, 15 December 2008;
2.Third level for BS HRM, TP 06 Series of 2010, 03 February 2010

IV.CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES: (see “SHRIM Events Pics”)

A.Wine Appreciation Seminar – September 15, 2008
B.Culinary Demonstration – September 16, 2008
C.Dumaguete Study Tour – September 15-17, 2008
D.Culinary Fusion – December 6, 2008
E.PSITE National Convention – February 26, 2009
F.Culinary Class by Chef Ed Dychauco – March 4-8, 2009
G.WOFEX Visayas – April 23-25, 2009
H.KUMBIRA 2009 – August 13-15, 2010
I.Cagayan de Oro Study Tour – August 13-15, 2009
J.Flair & Bartending Demonstration and Seminar – August 26, 2009
K.Culinary Congress – September 25, 2009
L.Bartending Seminar by Jamaican F&B – January 27, 2010
M.1st SHRIM Days – February 23-24, 2010
N.Cake Decorating Seminar by Chef Ed Dychauco – February 24, 2010

V.Faculty Members

1. Cherrie Rose J. Sagario – Coordinator
2. Rea Paula Monzon
3. Dofel Alexis Bacuño
4. Lila Cortes
5. Yolanda Rotea
6. Browinn Bucol
7. John Febb Vidal

VI.TOP ACHIEVERS

A.Dean’s Listers

1. Robert Michael Buchholz
2. Krizaine Cordero
3. Fitz Sheena Aranas
4. Hannah Florence Nasala
5. Queendolin Rubia
6. Janine Hechanova
7. Katrina Jane Tulang
8. Erly Iren Patagoc

B.Flair Bartenders

1. Lyndon Recera
2. Jay Ceballos
3. Mark Jim Ochotorena
4. Hannah Florence Nasala
5. Denmark Rectazo
6. Anthony Samson
7. Hazel Villagracia
8. Mark Louie Buzon

VII.ADMISSION AND RETENTION POLICY

The School of Hotel, Restaurant, and Institution Management follows the general institutional admission and retention policy.

VIII.NEWS/DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRAMS

SHRIM Lab

DMC’s School of Hotel, Restaurant and Institution Management (HRIM) has some of the most modern laboratory facilities in the region.

It has state-of-the-art hot and cold kitchen laboratories which simulates an actual industrial food service setup. These kitchens are used by the students for their culinary courses.

The School of HRIM also houses a well-stocked bartending laboratory where students practice their bartending skills.

Students practice their hotel operations skills in a mock hotel suite which features all of the facilities and amenities found in a luxury hotel suite and in the Front Office laboratory where they are acquainted with the functions of the front office which acts as the nerve center in a hotel.

TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT (TESDA)

Registered Program with the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority
under
Unified TVET Program Registration and Accreditation System (UTPRAS)

I.PROGRAMS

The TESDA program in DMCCFI is an approach to vocational education and training emphasizing what a person can accomplish in the workplace as a result of completing a program of training. The training is based on curriculum development from the competency standards specified by the industry and the learning is modular in its structure wherein the trainee is allowed to progress at his/her own pace. It allows for multiple entry and exit in the system. It also recognizes both on-and off-the-job delivery modes. After successfully completing the program, the trainee is required to undergo competency assessment and acquire National Certification.

Each training program consists of competencies which a person needs to achieve based on the given qualification in his chosen field of occupation. It describes the core, common, and basic competencies required in the performance of a specific occupation. A value-adding feature of the CBT program approach is the integration of the basic computer literacy, work ethics and values development, entrepreneurship development, leadership, and gender sensitivity training. These programs are nationally promulgated to ensure that the trainees receive quality, relevant and employable skills, knowledge, and attitude

Approved

Title Duration Registration No (CoPR)

CAREGIVING NC II

6 Months WTR # 04090202035
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING NC IV 252 Hours WTR # 07090204019
HOUSEHOLD SERVICES NC II 216 Hours WTR # 07090202232
HOUSEKEEPING NC II 436 Hours WTR # 08090202077
BARTENDING NC II 286 Hours WTR # 09090202004
COMMERCIAL COOKING NC II 436 Hours WTR # 09090202021
SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING NC II 268 Hours WTR # 09090202069
BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION NC II 402 Hours WTR # 09090202137
GAS METAL ARC WELDING NC II 268 Hours WTR # 09090202185

Applied

FOOD AND BEVERAGE SERVICE NC II
FRONT OFFICE NC II
BAKING AND PASTRY NC II
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICING NC II
COMPUTER HARDWARE SERVICING NC II
GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING (GTAW) NC II
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATIONS (BULLDOZER) NC II
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATIONS (WHEEL LOADER) NC II
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATIONS (MOTOR GRADER) NC II

CONGRESSMAN ROSENDO “DODOY” LABADLABAD
I-CARE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

(Offered AT DMCCFI)

COMMERCIAL COOKING NC II 5:00PM-9:00PM
HOUSEKEEPING SERVICES NC II 5:00PM-9:00PM
GAS METAL ARC WELDING (GMAW) NC II 5:00PM-9:00PM
BUILDING WIRING INSTALLATION NC II 5:00PM-9:00PM
SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW) NC II 5:00PM-9:00PM
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING NC IV 5:00PM-9:00PM

II.FACULTY

Joelito “Toto” Lecias Turno – TESDA Coordinator

fac04

Joelito, fondly called “Toto” by his co-employees, completed his degree in Electronics Engineering Technology (major in Computer) at Mindanao State University – Iligan Institute of Technology in Iligan City on March 1990. Upon recommendation of DMC Vice President for Academics, Atty. Albert T. Concha Jr, Turno was officially designated as TESDA coordinator on June 1, 2009.

During Turno’s first foray in DMC, he was appointed Assistant Laboratory In-Charge (Information Technology) and Hardware Technician on September 1, 2004. On July 29, 2005, Turno was instated as Electronic Data Processor of DMC-College Foundation. Also, he was appointed as the Sports Coordinator of the school on November 24, 2006, a position which Turno still holds up to the present.

III.NEWS/DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRAMS

TESDA specialists inspect the Tech-Voc Department’s equipment and facilities.

DMC unveils electrical, welding training center

“One thing I promise to DMC is that we give our students the quality of education and the best equipment for them to learn.”

Read more

SCIENCE HIGH SCHOOL: De La Salle Supervised School

I.VISION – MISSION, AND OBJECTIVES

Institutional Goal:

The DMC College Foundation has set forth its main goal the development of each student’s cultural, social, physical and mental capacities so that he/she will become a freedom-loving, integrated, competent and responsible person in the service of God and society. In ensuring the realization of this goal, the faculty must voluntarily accept the responsibility of maintaining and upholding the school’s objectives:

  • Providing superior quality training to the students to prepare them to meet the required intellectual, moral, technical, and ethical skills of a true professional;
  • Ensuring effective practice and morale in the students’ future professions by incorporating real-life situations in their learning experiences and instilling in their minds the value of integrity and discipline; and
  • Motivating the members of the academic community into strengthening their commitment to society by nourishing and maintaining their skills and competence through continuing education and training.

Objectives:

In keeping with the mission-vision of the institution, the DMC Science High School department is committed to:

  • Develop students who will excel in all the academic and non-academic programs through the acquisition of scientific and technological skills and competencies, enabling the students to respond creatively to the changing needs of society.
  • Strengthen the character of Filipino Lasallians through spiritual, cultural, social and sports development with the view of sharing students’ giftedness to the less privileged.
    Provide students opportunities to take an active part in the continuing development of a just and humane environment.
  • To assist the students/pupils in developing skills in critical thinking, responsible education, and communication necessary for their full participation as citizens of the country.
    Imbue the school community with the spirit of faith and zeal through strong catechetical and religious animation programs.

II.HISTORY

In the year 2000, the DMC Science High School was opened with six pioneering students. Guided by the strong will to promote and foster quality education, the DMC Science High School established partnership with Lasallian Schools Supervision Association, Inc. (LASSAI) for the administration and supervision of its academic programs and services. Hence, in the year 2005, the DMC Science High School signed a Memorandum of Agreement with LASSO as a Consultancy School which is the first stage in the application for Supervision.

III.CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

The ZDN Press Club shares their time with participants from respective primary and tertiary school press club during the conference hosted by DMC College.

Real media personalities sharing their knowledge and know-how with participants during the Press Conference

Students from different high school and elementary news orgs from the City of Dipolog work together during the National Press Conference .

Participants of the National Press Conference 2009 held at the DMC Auditorium

IV.COMMUNITY EXTENSION SERVICES

V.FACULTY MEMBERS

FRANCISCO MONTAÑO
VP for High School

ELIZABETH C. OCER
Principal

ULISYL MENORIAS
BRIGGITE RAAGAS
LOUIE JAY TUIZA
MARY BLESS PAUNILIAN
RRYAM JARALVE
ANN FRANCE BUHISAN
ARAIBO JOSE ELUMBA
JOSEPH JEFFREY DALISAY
GERLADINE CASTAÑEROS
JOSEPH LUIS CARREON
ANDY WONG
REYNALD KYAMKO
JOSELITO DARIO LACAYA
KATHLYN TANGCAY
REYNELDA ENGUITO
JEFFREY LAPUT

PRE-SCHOOL

I. VISION, MISSION, AND OBJECTIVES

Objectives: To build a strong education, quality learning, and solid foundation.

Attuned with the school’s vision-mission, the DMC College Foundation Pre-School seeks to develop the child physically, intellectually, psychologically, aesthetically and spiritually by meeting his/her needs in actual-living experience through self-activity in a prepared environment.

A. Physical Development. To develop muscular control of the small and big muscles, health, the habit of hygiene, and coordination movement through rhythmic and gymnastic activity and games, indoor and outdoor free play.

B. Intellectual Development. To prepare the child’s mind for later systematic learning, the core knowledge curriculum aims to:

i. Achieve refinement of the senses as receptors for developmental experiences and skill in using one’s fingers
ii. Awaken the child’s cognitive power and develop the ability to think, observe, classify, plan, communicate and preserve by him/herself rather than accumulate memorize knowledge.
iii. Form basic concepts through first-hand experience in self-chosen, guided, creative and constructive play activities.
iv. Psychological Development. To develop self-confidence, initiative and emotional security through the experience of success and acceptance. To develop a happy attitude towards life as a necessary pre-requisite to successful living and learning.
v. Aesthetic Development. Develop creative self-expression and a sense for beauty, performing arts through a rich program of art activity, musical experiences and appreciation of the beauty of nature.
vi. Spiritual Development. Develop in the child the desire to live as a true Lasallian and a child of God by actual application of the Lasallian values and virtues, kindness, truth and honesty. Appreciation of work and the desire to do good, respect the rights of others, to share and to follow accepted rules of democratic living.

II.PROGRAMS

De La Salle DMC Preschool follows the prescribed curriculum of De La Salle Schools for Junior Kindergarten and Senior Kindergarten. For Jumpstart (Toddler) and Nursery, the Core Knowledge Curriculum--an American standard curriculum for preschool--is implemented.

The following are the programs offered:

JUMP START
2 ½ to 3 years and 5 months

Jump Start uses a thematic-interdisciplinary approach in teaching. It focuses on equipping the child with the necessary skills for a smooth transition to a school setting and successful school performance in the future, mostly through socialization with other children and active play using educational materials. Activities include indoor play, music and movement, and art activities, to name a few.

NURSERY CLASS
3 ½ to 4 years and 5 months

Nursery Class integrates the learning and enhancement of social skills and emerging literacy skills, particularly through cooperative play, music and movement, and story telling. Pre-academic concepts are introduced in preparation for the 3 Rs to be learned in Kindergarten (Reading, wRiting, and aRithmetic).

JUNIOR KINDERGARTEN CLASS
4 ½ to 5 years and 5 months

Junior Kindergarten covers the learning of English Reading, Writing and Language, Mathematics, Computer, Music, Arts and Movement and Christian Living.

SENIOR KINDERGARTEN CLASS
5 ½ to 6 years and 5 months

Senior Kindergarten prepares the child for primary school by equipping them with a higher degree of learning in English Reading, Writing and Language, Filipino, Science, Mathematics, Social Studies, Computer, Music, Arts and Movements and Christian Living.

III.HISTORY

The De La Salle DMC Preschool is one of the La Salle Supervised Schools in the country and the only in the region. La Salle Schools were founded by the Brothers of the Christian Schools, also known as FRATRES SCHOLARUM CHRISTIANARUM, dedicated to educating founded by St. John Baptist de La Salle.

As a La Salle Supervised School, DMC Preschool is geared towards cultivating Christian values to every child, nurturing them morally and socio-emotionally, and enhancing their physical and intellectual potentials. It is a child-friendly and child-centered school which focuses on the holistic development of the child.

DMC Preschool’s educational programs give the child diverse developmentally appropriate learning activities consequently promoting the child’s socio-emotional skills, scholastic competence, physical development, self-awareness, independence, and sense of responsibility.

AUXILIARY SERVICES AND FACILITIES

  • Guidance Office - The Guidance Office aids in the full development of each pupil by cooperating with the significant others in his/her environment. Its services include interviews, counseling, consultation, referrals, information, placement, individual inventory and follow-ups.
  • Campus Ministry Office – It complements classroom instruction by providing spiritual and social activities like retreats, masses, outreach, and others.
  • Library – Each classroom is provided with a wide array of books to develop the child’s love for reading.
    Health Services – Pupils from De La Salle DMC Preschool are sure to have bi-annual medical check-ups and dental consultations. Results are handed out to parents for follow-up.
  • Computer Laboratory – It is where Computer classes are held. Children are assigned to their own computers giving them flexibility in learning. Online educational games to enhance classroom instruction are also available.
  • Playground – Furnished with different kinds of physical equipment, the playground is modeled to suit the need for gross motor development of the child.
  • Safety and Security – DMC Preschool is located at the heart of DMC campus. Aside from the safety measures provided by the campus, DMC Preschool also assures the children’s safety by building a fence around its area with a Disciplinary Officer manning the goings in and out of the gate. Traffic flow is also prevented by giving ample space to park vehicles. In addition, a strict policy in picking up children from school is implemented.

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES

  • Campus Tour – An educational tour inside the campus where children are exposed to different kinds of places and people. A tour in the laboratories of the School of HRIM, and the Nursing Department will give them a vicarious experience of what hotels and hospitals are.
  • Nutrition Day – To remember the importance of a healthy lifestyle, children are asked to bring nutritious food for the class to share. Likewise, the teacher, with the help of the pupils, prepares a healthy snack for everyone. Awards are then given to healthy and happy children.
  • Family Day – Parents and other members of the family are asked to bond with their children through games, activities and more. This is a way of celebrating the essence of being a part of a family.
  • Christmas Party – It’s a time for everyone to have fun and reminisce the meaning of the season through giving and sharing. Children present various performances like play, dancing or singing to entertain the audience.
  • Recognition/Graduation Ceremony – Children are acknowledged for their achievement all throughout the year.

IV.FACULTY PROFILE

Mrs. Carissa Pia Montaño – Concha
Administrator
VP – Basic Education

She is a graduate of Bachelor of Science in Nursing at the De Los Santos Medical Center, Manila. Likewise, she is a licensed Nurse. Mrs. Carrie Concha is also a proud mother of two kids. Her role and experience as a mother taught her to treat every pupil in school as her own.

Miss Adamey A. Domogo
Toddler and Nursery Teacher

She graduated from the University of the Philippines in Diliman, Quezon City with a degree of Bachelor of Science in Family Life and Child Development – a course which particularly caters to the needs of early childhood. Teacher Adam hails from Besao, Mountain Province and is fully committed to giving quality education to every child.

Miss Iris C. Duhaylongsod
Junior Kindergarten Teacher

Also a graduate of the University of the Philippines- Diliman, Teacher Iris finished her degree Bachelor in Elementary Education Major in Teaching the Early Grades (Kinder-Grade 2) as magna cum laude. Moreover, she recently ranked 5th in the Licensure Examination for Teachers held September 2008. Her goals are attuned to spreading high-standard education to all.

Miss Dorothy April M. Gahum
Senior Kindergarten Teacher

A graduate of Bachelor of Science in Special Education, Teacher Dot applied her profession in one of the schools catering to special children. From there, she then moved on to teach for 5 years in one of the prestigious private schools in Quezon City. Moving back to her Dipolog hometown, Teacher Dot aims to enhance the learning skills of each child.

Miss Dianne Cecelia G. Enoy
Assistant Teacher
Toddler and Nursery

Teacher Dianne graduated as cum laude from Jose Rizal Memorial State University with a degree of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education major in General Sciences. She is a child educator who gives genuine teachings, care and guidance.

V. ADMISSION AND RETENTION POLICY

Admission and Retention Policy

1. The child’s age should be within the age range of the class levels offered.

1.1. Toddler – 2 ½ to 3 years and 5 months old
1.2. Nursery – 3 ½ years old and 4 years and 5 months
1.3. Junior Kindergarten – 4 ½ years old and 5 years and 5 months
1.4. Senior Kindergarten – 5 ½ years old and 6 years and 5 months

2. Transferees entering Senior Kindergarten should pass the school’s assessment test.

3. In order to be accepted to the next level, the pupil should get a grade of C- and above, for Junior Kindergarten, and 75% for Senior Kindergarten.

VI. FACULTY –STUDENT CONSULTATION

An appointment with the class teacher should be set if ever there are questions and clarifications regarding the pupil’s performance.

COLLEGE OF LAW

I. MISSION, VISSION AND OBJECTIVES

MISSION

A society founded on the supremacy of the law.

VISION

To train men and women for moral excellence and technical competence in the disciplines of law.

OBJECTIVES

The primary goal of the College of Law is preparation and development of community-oriented lawyers by providing quality legal education through proper instruction and guidance on the principles of law and system of administration of justice in the country.

The College of Law in line with the goal of promoting quality education which is community-oriented, expects its graduates to;

1. Instill the practice of high ethical principles as proper guidelines in their professional and private life;
2. Be proficient in advocacy;
3. Possess the desire and capacity for continuing studey and self improvement.
4. Promote the objectives of the Integrated Bar of the Philippines (IBP) which includes:

a. Elevation of the standards of the legal profession.
b. Improvement of the administration of justice.
c. Encouragement of the Bar to discharge \its public responsibility more effectively.

5. Be able to provide legal assistance to poor but deserving families.

INTERNAL POLICIES OF THE COLLEGE OF LAW

I. ADMISSION

All incoming freshmen Bachelor of Law students should comply with the following requirements:

Under DECS Memorandum No. 27 series of 1989 on Policies and Standard for Legal Education and DECS No. 46 series of1998, the requirements for law program are as follows:

1.Applicant-student must be a graduate of a bachelor’s degree
2.Applicant-student must have 12 units in English, 6 units in mathematics and 18 units in social science.

II. ADMISSION OF TRANSFEREES

a.The applicant-student must be a graduate of a bachelor’s degree
b.In addition, the college requires every applicant to undergo and pass the entrance examination and present the following credentials:

i. Transcript of Records
ii. Certificate of Eligibility into the Law Program (C1) from the Registrar where he has obtained the baccalaureate degree.
iii. Honorable dismissal for non-DMC graduates
iv. Certificate of good moral character

III. RETENTION AND PROMOTION OF SRUDENTS

a. A student in the College should have a grade of 3.0 in order to pass the subject
b. Any grade below 3.0 will be computed as 5.0
c. Must properly demonstrate proper behavior that is expected of a student in the College of Law
d. In all matters pertaining to grades, the decision of the Dean is deemed final

IV. DEBARMENT FROM THE COLLEGE OF LAW

A student in the College of Law may be debarred from the College following the two-failure rule in any of the subjects enrolled. He shall only gain immunity during the second semester of the junior year in the college.

V. GRADUATION

The following are the requisites for graduation:

1.Students who are candidates for graduation should have taken and passed the required subjects before they will be recommended for graduation.
2.Students must also comply with the required number of hours as prescribed the Practice Court subject.

II. HISTORY

The Commission on Higher Education (CHEd) granted the permit to operate the Law Program to DMC College Foundation on March 29, 2010. The first Dean of the College of Law is Atty. Yolando G. Villaruz, a graduate of Ateneo de Manila University.

III. FACULTY

Atty. Yolando G. Villaruz
Dean

Ms. Kathleen Grace G. Gregorio
College Secretary

TOP